" as="other"> COVID 19 Age Group Tip Sheets - MyBioGate Global COVID-19 Resources Platform

Published: March, 2020 From Harvard Medical School

About COVID-19

Created by the COVID-19 Health Literacy Project in collaboration with Harvard Health Publishing.

What is COVID-19?
▪ COVID-19 is a contagious respiratory illness.
▪ This infection is caused by a new coronavirus that was first seen in Wuhan, China.
▪ Many infected people have mild or no symptoms. Difficulty breathing, pneumonia, organ.

How does COVID-19 spread?
▪ Person to person: You can become infected by breathing in an infected person’s cough or sneeze droplets from up to 6 feet away
▪ Contaminated surfaces: You can become infected by touching contaminated surfaces and then touching your mouth, nose, or eyes. High-risk surfaces include door handles, elevator buttons, counters, cellphones, and surfaces in common areas.

Can I get COVID-19?
▪ Yes. You may have been exposed if:
▪ You live with someone with COVID-19
▪ You took care of someone with COVID-19
▪ You were in contact with someone with COVID-19
▪ You touched a contaminated surface or object
▪ You may be more likely to get COVID-19 if you traveled recently, are a healthcare worker, or were in a place with many cases.
▪ You are at risk for more serious symptoms if you have a weak immune system, heart disease, lung disease, or are older than 60.

Can I get COVID-19?
▪ Yes. You may have been exposed if:
▪ You live with someone with COVID-19
▪ You took care of someone with COVID-19
▪ You were in contact with someone with COVID-19
▪ You touched a contaminated surface or object
▪ You may be more likely to get COVID-19 if you traveled recently, are a healthcare worker, or were in a place with many cases.
▪ You are at risk for more serious symptoms if you have a weak immune system, heart disease, lung disease, or are older than 60.

How can I protect myself and others?
▪ Avoid close contact or sharing personal items with people who are sick
▪ Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth
▪ Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash
▪ Clean surfaces and frequently touched objects
▪ Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use a hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol if soap and water are not available
▪ Stay home and avoid being with people outside of your immediate family

What are the symptoms?
▪ Common symptoms: dry cough, fever, shortness of breath
▪ Less common symptoms: fatigue, muscle and joint pain, sore throat, headache.

How is COVID-19 different from the flu?
COVID-19 and the flu cause similar symptoms, but the viruses that cause these illnesses are different.
▪ The virus causing COVID-19 spreads easily and is more likely to cause severe symptoms and death. Unlike the flu, these is currently no vaccine or drug to treat COVID-19.

What should I do if I feel sick?
▪ Stay home and call your doctor. If you are having trouble breathing, suddenly feel drowsy or confused, or notice your lips or face turning blue, call 911.
▪ Most people with mild symptoms can recover at home. If you must leave home to see a doctor, call beforehand and avoid public transport

Prevent the spread of COVID-19

Stay home whenever you can, except to get medical care!a

Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds

Avoid touching your eyes,nose, and mouth.

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Do so before you eat or prepare food, and after you sneeze, cough, blow your nose, or visit any public place. If you cannot wash with soap and water, use hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol.

The virus can last on some surfaces for several days. You can become infected if you touch these surfaces and then touch your eyes, nose, or mouth.

Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces.

Cover coughs and sneezes with a tissue or your elbow.

Plan how to take care of yourself and loved ones.

Using alcohol solutions that contain at least 70% alcohol, or diluted household bleach solutions, clean frequently used objects like phones, keys, tablets, doorknobs, and TV remotes.

Coronavirus is primarily spread through droplets when an infected person coughs or sneezes near others. Do not cough or sneeze into your hand.

Older adults and people with chronic medical conditions are at higher risk and should consult with doctors about staying protected. Create a list of emergency contacts and designate space in your home for sick family members.

The DO’s and DON’Ts of prevention

DO

Stay home, except to get medical care. If you have severe symptoms, call 911.
Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds (or use hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol).
Cover your coughs and sneezes with your elbow or sleeve.
Stay informed by visiting the COVID-19 website of your local health department, the CDC, and the WHO.
Stay connected with friends and family over the phone or video chat.

DON’T

Don’t leave your house or be in groups for non-essential purposes.
Don’t wear a facemask or gloves unless you are sick or caring for someone who is sick.
Don’t cough or sneeze into your hands.
Don’t gather information from unverified sources.
Don’t visit friends and family because you may put each other at greater risk.

COVID-19 and pregnancy

I’m pregnant. How will I be affected?

Is COVID-19 more severe in
pregnant women?

 

 

If I contract COVID-19, will I

have pregnancy complications?

 

If I have COVID-19, can the virus be
passed to my baby?

How can I protect myself
from getting COVID-19?

Will there be enough doctors
to care for me and my baby?

We don’t know whether pregnant women are more susceptible. Pregnant women are at greater risk of severe disease from related viruses, so pregnant women are considered an at-risk population. However, we expect that most pregnant women will experience moderate or mild cold or flu-like symptoms.

We do not yet know whether COVID-19 adversely impacts pregnancy. Pregnancy loss has been observed in cases of infection with other coronaviruses (e.g. SARS). High fevers in the first trimester can also be harmful to the baby.

 Currently, there is no evidence of COVID-19 passing from a mother to baby in the womb. If you have COVID-19, take precautions after your baby is born to prevent infection (e.g.hand-washing).

Prevention for pregnant women is the same as for the general public. Consult CDC guidelines.

Yes. The hospital will ensure you are both safe
and cared for.

What should I do?

How can I manage the
anxiety I am feeling?

Should I still attend
antenatal appointments with
my OB/GYN?

Should I consider a home birth to avoid exposure to COVID-19 in the hospital?

This is a stressful time for many, especially those who are pregnant. There are several resources that suggest ways to minimize anxiety during this challenging time.

Call your OB/GYN to ask about their recommendations. These may vary based on available resources, your medical history, and pregnancy stage.

The hospital can seem like a scary place at this time. However, there are infection protocols to ensure the safety of you and your baby. Home births carry serious risks to mother and child. Please discuss
your concerns with your OB/GYN.

What if I want to get pregnant in the next few months?

▪ Call your doctor, especially if you suspect you are infected or may become infected. Wait to conceive until you are cleared by your doctor.
▪ If you want to prevent pregnancy, consult your doctor to ensure you have enough contraceptives. If you suspect you or your partner is infected, remember that close physical contact can increase risk of transmission.

What to do if you are sick with COVID-19 or suspect you are infected?

What can I expect?

▪ COVID-19 is usually a mild illness. Healthy people under age 60 often experience symptoms similar to the flu: fever (over 100.4°F), dry cough, sore throat, and fatigue for two weeks.
▪ If you have mild symptoms, call your primary care doctor. Tell them if you have been in contact with anyone who might have COVID-19.
▪ Your doctor will tell you if and where you can get tested.
▪ Because testing is not yet widely available, your doctor may tell you to stay at home for 14 days or more in case you have the infection.

Should I see a doctor?

▪ Serious symptoms are more common in people over age 60 and those with heart disease, lung disease, or cancer. But even young, healthy people can have severe symptoms.
▪ When severe, COVID-19 can require hospitalization.
▪ Call your doctor before you go to the doctor’s office or emergency room.

Call 911 if you have:
• Difficulty breathing
• New confusion or suddenly feeling drowsy
• Bluish lips or face

What is the treatment like?

▪ There is currently no specific treatment for COVID-19.
▪ Most people will begin to feel better with drinking fluids and rest.
▪ Acetaminophen (Tylenol) can help lower fevers and ease muscle pains.
▪ If you develop severe symptoms and have to go to the hospital, doctors will create a specialized plan to care for you.

How do I avoid getting others sick, too?

“Home isolate”for ~2 weeks

Keep away from other people

Keep your hands clean

Keep your home clean

If you think you might have COVID-19, you should “home isolate.” Decisions about stopping home isolation should be made in consultation with your doctor.

Use a separate bedroom, bathroom, and cooking space from others if possible. Wear a facemask if you have one. Avoid sharing personal items.

Cover your coughs and sneezes. Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth. Wash your hands with soap and water for 20 seconds or use hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.

Clean frequently touched surfaces (tables, doorknobs, toilets, phones, keyboards, light switches) every day with alcohol solutions (70% alcohol), diluted bleach solutions, or household disinfectants.

Link : https://covid19healthliteracyproject.com/#languages